Donate to Tangmere

News & Events

Vampire Arrives

De Havilland Vampire T11 XH313 is the latest aircraft to join the Tangmere collection and was delivered to the Museum towards the end of October.

Vampire design origins date back to 1941, and the maiden flight of the first prototype was flown by Geoffrey de Havilland on September 20th 1943 – only six months after the maiden flight of the first Meteor. Small and light – it had to be due to the low power of early jet engines, the Vampire’s Goblin engine giving just 2100 lbs of thrust – the Vampire was the first single jet engine fighter produced in the UK and though the first production Mk 1 Vampire first flew in April 1945 its on-going development process meant it did not see active service in WW2.

As the early centrifugal flow jet engines gave way to the more compact axial flow engines the pace of development was rapid and higher power was soon available leading to new more capable aircraft such as the Hunter, so by the mid 50s RAF front line service of the Vampire was over and the type was relegated to training and liason roles. The T11, a two seat side by side trainer version, was the final version produced, deliveries commencing not long after the first T11 flight in 1950, and this version remained in RAF service until 1966.

In total over 15 Marks of Vampire were made and the overall production volume amounted to more than 3200 aircraft. The Vampire served in 31 Air Forces.

XH313 was first delivered to the RAF in February 1956 and moved to 111 Squadron at North Weald in August of that year. It remained with them until October 1964 when it was moved to the Central Air Traffic Control School, its final home with the RAF until it passed into civilian hands in 1970.

Though substantially complete there is some repair and restoration work to be done and a number of cockpit instruments need to be located. Anyone able to help with this is invited to contact the Museum We look forward to having it on display for the start of our 2009 season.

Latest News

New Percival Provost Painting

The Percival Provost T1 was an all metal single-engined two seat monoplane built as an advanced training aircraft for the RAF. The type entered…

Continue reading

Tangmere Military Aviation Museum Reopens

Tangmere Military Aviation Museum reopens its doors to the public on Wednesday 1 February after its annual two-monthly closure. During this ‘closed period’ our…

Continue reading

Chairman's Review of 2016

At 25,738, the total number of visitors in 2016 was down by 10.0% on the figure for 2015 with the number of paying visitors…

Continue reading

Tangmere's 2017 Events Programme Announced

As usual, the Museum is planning to run a full programme of events in 2017. Here are some of the highlights:

  • You can pay using these credit cards:
  • visa
  • mastercard
  • maestro
  • switch
  • switch
  • jcb
  • Awards:
  • awards for all
  • Visit England Accredited
  • Arts Council
Top